Colorhue and Rust Dyed Pillow Case

 

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Okay, so I debated about posting this because I am essentially using the same technique that I used in my last Rust Dyed Pillow Covers post. Well, with one important exception. This pillow case was dyed with Colorhue Dye before I placed the rusty bits on top. So, I decided to take this opportunity to discuss these dyes. I’m also so enamored with the turquoise and rust color combination that I had to share my gorgeous pics!

I have used Colorhue dyes extensively in my work. They were the first dyes that I really dove into when making scarves. They are wonderful dyes but they aren’t perfect and I have had trouble finding ANYONE out there discussing the pitfalls of this dye. According to the Dharma Trading website they are instant set concentrated dyes that require no heat setting.

Well that’s not exactly true in my experience. After a tremendous amount of trial and error I have found that although these dyes do strike incredibly fast, they do indeed require a little help to be colorfast. Without heat setting I have found that the color will run endlessly in my wash water. Certain colors are worse than others (red, black, and brown) but they all do this to some extent. Additionally, the Dharma site says that it is difficult to get good depth of color and a dark black. Much to the contrary I have been able to get beautiful saturated color (including deep blacks) with these dyes.

At one point I called the manufacturer because I was SO frustrated with my inability to completely fix these dyes. They recommended soaking my textiles in vinegar before dyeing. I have found that a vinegar soak (15 – 30 minutes) helps but the most important step is heat setting. My first attempt at heat setting was to microwave my fabric for approximately 3 minutes in a glass Pyrex dish covered in plastic wrap. This required stopping every minute or so to allow the steam to settle so that my plastic wouldn’t explode (you can guess how I learned that this was a necessary step). Ultimately, I discovered that a hot iron placed on top of my bundle (through a cloth or paper towel) right after dyeing was the fastest and most efficient method for setting this dye. I do this for approximately three minutes (turning the fabric every minute or so and moving my iron continuously so that I don’t scorch the fabric) and then I give it a good wash before hanging it to dry. There will still be some excess dye in your wash water but it WILL stop and your dye will be permanent at this point.

You can easily mix these dyes to get more color variation and although they are expensive they do go a long way. You can dip dye with them and you can dye more precisely using a dropper (I like the glass ones). If you want to see lots of examples check out my Etsy site (many of my scarves have been dyed with Colorhue dyes). Oh, one last bit, these dyes ONLY work on silk or silk blends although some of the information that I have read says they work on cellulose fibers (not so much, ask me how I know!).

Materials:

  • silk
  • vinegar
  • Colorhue Dye
  • aluminum foil
  • rusty bits
  • bricks, pavers, or rocks
  • time!
  • Derwink Inktense sticks, So Soft fabric paint, Lumiere fabric paint (optional)
  • hot iron
  • mild detergent

Tutorial

Step 1: Soak your fabric in vinegar and then dip it in a bath of Colorhue dye for 10-15 seconds. This dye is water based and non toxic (making it a good choice when working with kids – but it will stain, so be careful). This dye is also a concentrate so you simply mix it with water until you achieve the color you desire. I often dip a small piece of paper towel in my dye to check the color – bearing in mind that it will look several shades lighter when it’s dry. Please note that I decided to hold off on heat setting until after I did my rust dyeing since both dyes require heat to set.

Step 2: Lay out your fabric as flat as possible on a layer of aluminum foil and place your metal bits on half of your fabric.

This color combination is ridiculous!!! My rusty bits have been sitting outside since my last project and it seems that abject neglect has served them well! Fingers crossed for some beautiful fabric!

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I had to include this one because it’s just so darn pretty!

Step 3: Fold your fabric on top of the first half being careful not to disturb your design.

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Step 4: Place another piece of foil on top and then lay something heavy on top of that to insure good contact between your fabric and your rusty stuff. In the last pillow cover tutorial I recommended that you seal your foil before placing your bricks (or whatever) on top. I have since read that air helps to facilitate the rusting process so I have decided not to seal the foil this time. It will be interesting to see if the rust transfers more quickly (last time it took three days).

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Step 5: Once you have achieved a color that you are satisfied with open things up and let your fabric completely dry out. It’s been two days and I’m loving the color, so maybe not sealing things up was a good idea?

Things are still wet here, so the color is darker than it will be, but I LOVE how the blue seems to be turning green around the rusty bits! Also bear in mind that the rusty pieces are still in place so the fabric will definitely look different when I open this up and the bits are removed.

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In fact, since it just needs to dry out I don’t see why I can’t open it up now?! My impatient nature strikes again! Here goes!

Wow. Sooooooooo pretty. It’s like a gorgeous painting and can I tell you how much I love the pops of orange and gold?! I wish I could leave the metal pieces in place! But alas, they must go…

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Still really pretty, but I’m missing the orange and gold (maybe a little embellishing is in order?). And this is still wet so I’m anxious to see how it looks when it’s dry…it’s interesting how the rust transferred more strongly on the right or top half. I like that there is some variation in the pattern and the green is really lovely.

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Step 6: Embellish, or not. I decided to go for it with these and this for a little bit of gold sparkle. I did this while it was still a bit wet because the Inktense sticks require moisture. I defined some of the squares with a grey/black Inktense stick and I added orange and red accents with the same product. I painted gold onto some of the squares which I realize is difficult to see in the pic below, but it is a nice addition.

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I just couldn’t leave well enough alone. :/ I was craving a more saturated turquoise, more contrast overall and a bigger pop of color…so it went back into the Colorhue dye for about 3 minutes. I like that the rusty areas went more brown and less orange (more like when it was wet) and I’m happy that the blue is deeper. I also did a bit more embellishing with this in Metallic Bronze and I darkened some of the outlines with a mix of brown and black fabric paint. It definitely has a Gustav Klimt vibe. 🙂

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Step 7: Let it “cure” for 24 hours.

Step 8: Iron on high for three minutes to set the color.

Step 9: Wash in a mild detergent. I used Synthrapol, which is a professional textile detergent, but any mild detergent or shampoo is fine (shampoo works great on protein fibers because hair is made out of protein). Hang to dry and iron.

Here it is! If you would rather buy then diy go here. 🙂

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