Eco Dyed Easter Eggs

 

IMG_20160317_183020

Okay folks, my objective is to make these as simple as possible. Like me, I’m sure that many of you are busy parents, or simply busy people. So the thought of going to the trouble of eco dyeing eggs is a bit daunting especially when you can run to the store and buy those nasty little tablets and voila – dyed eggs! Yes, I’ve done it. Many times. But this year, I will be eco dyeing and it will not be difficult. Alright, so maybe it will be more work than those little tablets, but you will be able to rest easy knowing that your eggs are totally free of synthetic dyes. And that’s worth its weight in gold, right?!

Let me break it down for you. You only need to make three colors – the primary ones (red, blue, and yellow). All of the other colors will be derived from those colors. So if you’re up for doing that, then you’re good to go!

Materials:

  • Two dozen hard boiled eggs
  • Red beets (about three large)
  • Purple cabbage (about 1 medium sized head) – this will make blue dye!
  • Turmeric
  • Vinegar
  • Water
  • Pot for boiling
  • 6 glass jars with lids (the standard wide mouth Ball jars work great)

Tutorial

Step 1: Rough chop your beets until you have about 4 cups – I used three large beets. Rough chop your head of cabbage until you have 8 cups – I used one medium cabbage. For the turmeric you will need 2-4 tablespoons (depending upon how yellow you want your eggs). Place each dye stuff in a separate pot. Add 8 cups of water and 4 tablespoons of vinegar to each pot. Bring to a boil, turn your heat down to medium and set your timer for 30 minutes. Strain your liquid and put it back in your pot. The turmeric pot can remain as is – no straining needed. At this point, you can let your liquid cool off or not, it’s up to you. Since I’m Little Miss Impatient, I didn’t wait. 

Step 2: Put 4 hard boiled eggs into each of the 6 glass jars. Use a ladle to put your primary colors (red, blue, yellow) into three of your jars. Fill until your eggs are completely covered. Now you will need to mix your dye to get your secondary colors:

  • Orange – approximately 3/4 turmeric dye to 1/4 beet dye
  • Green – approximately 3/4 turmeric dye to 1/4 cabbage dye
  • Purple – approximately 3/4 cabbage dye to 1/4 beet dye

Next just let your eggs soak. You can check your colors periodically to see how they are doing. For pastels it will take 30-60 minutes. For darker colors it will take several hours. You can even let them sit overnight if you want really saturated colors. I would pop them in the refrigerator if you decide to do this.

Once I got all of my eggs in their jars I went outside to arrange a beautiful picture for you (my lovely readers). I put my glass jars in a pretty little row on top of a wood table that was set against a white canvas. Then BAM a gust of wind kicked up and the whole thing fell forward. I wanted to cry. Two jars broke – tiny shards of glass went EVERYWHERE and most of the eggs cracked. Total nightmare. I was able to salvage three jars. :/

IMG_20160317_182614 (2)

So after cleaning up my gigantic mess and walking away for a bit to clear my head, I decided to go ahead and photograph all of the eggs so that you could see the colors. I’m so sad that there are so many cracked eggs because they are really pretty. 😦

If you decide to try this (and I really hope that you do) I have a few words to the wise. This is not an exact science and as you will soon see…your colors don’t always come out exactly as predicted. But that’s half the fun, especially when you are eco dyeing! So feel free to experiment! Vary the duration of time that your eggs sit in the the dye so that you get a range of colors. Or change up the ratios of dye in your mixtures and see what happens. Last but not least, this project is on the stinky side. The cabbage doesn’t smell great and the combo with the beets and the turmeric isn’t wonderful. So open up your windows and dye some eggs!

Here they are. 🙂

ecoeggsrainbowtwo

As you can see, my red went a little brown. I think it may have been because I threw some beet stems and roots into the mix. Of course this affected the secondary colors that I used it for…I don’t mind how the orange came out and the deep teal blue (last pic) is gorgeous but I was going for purple. I think this color was a result of the red being on the brown side and using too much blue in my mix. The variation in blues (bottom left) resulted from leaving the eggs in the dye for differing lengths of time. The lighter color took about 30 minutes while the darker blue took about three hours. You could get a beautiful ombre affect by using a dozen eggs and dyeing them in one color for differing lengths of time. Maybe next year. 🙂

Happy Easter!

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s