Easy Peasy Ikea Pillow Cover Hack

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Hello dear readers! I saw this pin on Pinterest and it inspired me to create this easy peasy, totally fabulous pillow cover. I was recently at my (not so local) Ikea store and I picked up a few of these pillow covers.

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I love the color and I love the fabric, which looks like linen but according to the package is made from ramie. What the heck is ramie? I did a little research and here’s what I found on this site:

Despite the shroud of mystery surrounding it, especially in the US market, ramie is evidently one of the oldest fibers cultivated for textiles. Commonly called China Grass, it is grown and used mainly in southern and eastern Asia (with some production in Brazil). Only a small percentage of the overall production seems to be exported for use in Euro/America. Ramie fibers are naturally white, which reduces the need for bleaching, but in order to be used in textiles, they require extensive processing, including de-gumming. The fibers are also very strong and—like linen—improve in strength when wet with very little shrinkage.

Interesting! It has a lovely hand and honestly I would not have known that it wasn’t linen if I hadn’t read the package. Anyways, it was a great starting point, but it was definitely crying out for some color and pattern. When I saw the pin for paper roll shape stamps that I mentioned above I thought, why not?

Materials:

Tutorial

Step 1: Grab and one of these:

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Then cut your paper towel roll holder in half (If you’re using a toilet paper roll holder, then you don’t need to cut it). I used a serrated knife thinking that I would get a cleaner cut and less squishing of the roll. The later was true, the first not so much. So I decided to use the nice, flat factory ends. Regardless, cutting it in half makes it more manageable to work with.

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Step 2: Manipulate your paper roll holder into whatever shape pleases you. I’m going for a squarish shape.

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Step 3: Put some paint or ink onto a flat surface and roll it out. I’m using a brayer, but a little paint roller would work fine. This is just to get your paint/ink into a nice thin layer so that you don’t blob too much paint onto your “stamp.”

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Step 4: Experiment on a scrap piece of fabric or even a paper towel until you find a pattern that you like.

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Step 5: Iron your pillow cover until it’s relatively flat. Then fold it in half and press it in both directions with your iron. This will give you your center point as well as vertical and horizontal lines to help guide you as you print.

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Step 6: Put a barrier of some sort between your fabric so that your paint doesn’t bleed through. I’m using a piece of clear vinyl, but aluminum foil would work fine.

Step 7: Gently pounce your stamp into your paint and begin stamping starting at your center point and working your way out.

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About 3/4 of the way through I noticed that my “stamp” was looking a bit squished and my prints weren’t as sharp. So, I decided to use the other end of my paper towel roll to start anew.

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Maybe I was a little too assertive with my stamping? Or maybe you will need to do this too…so I would have the other half of your paper towel roll handy. If you’re using a toilet paper roll, I suppose that you could simply turn it over. 🙂

Here it is right after I finished printing:

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As you can see, I put some paper towels around the edges. This helps to keep things nice and tidy so that when I’m done printing I can simply pull out the paper towels and I don’t have to worry about getting paint on the underside of my pillow.  You can also see that the row of circles at the bottom isn’t perfectly straight. I’m not sure where things went a bit off kilter, but I’m totally okay with it. This is a handcrafted, hand printed item, so imperfections are part of what makes it beautiful.

Step 8: Allow your fabric to dry completely and then heat set it with an iron on the hottest setting for 1-3 minutes. I generally place a cloth between my fabric and my iron in order to protect my work of art.

Here it is, so great, right?! And SO EASY, this truly requires no artistic ability and in my humble opinion it’s so much cuter than the plain pillow cover. I love the combination of grey and orange and I really love how the paint is brighter in the spots where it went on a bit thicker – It definitely adds dimension and interest to this simple, modern pattern.

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Block Printed Pillow

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Hi there lovely readers. After I forayed into block printing with my Eraser Stamp Pillow, I have to say that I became a little obsessed. This time I’m using an actual carving block and I’ve taken it up a few notches in terms of the pattern. I was inspired to try this technique when I saw Julie Balzer’s amazing hand carved stamps on Pinterest. The patterns look really complex, but when you break them down they’re totally doable! So hang in there with me on this one and you’ll see that the possibilities are endless!

Materials:

Tutorial

Step 1: Alright so we’re going to do a little math. In order to determine the size of the block that you’re going to carve you will need to measure your fabric and divide that number by an even number. In this case, my 14 x 14 inch pillow actually measures 13.5 x 13.5 inches. When I divide this by 4, I get 3.375 or 3 3/8 inches. I then cut a square out of my carving block using an exacto knife. It’s very helpful to use a metal ruler when cutting this material. Additionally, you will get a much cleaner cut if you cut in an up and down motion as opposed to dragging your knife across the block (which can result in snags and/or a jagged edge).

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Step 2: Now you need to mark off a grid on your carving block. This will make your design process much simpler and easier.

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Step 3: Design time! If you look carefully at the finished product above you will see that each square comes together to form an overall pattern. Essentially, each corner of your carving block is one quarter of a design. This will make more sense as we move along, I promise! Here’s my design. Feel free to copy mine, make small alterations, or completely change it and see what your get!

Hopefully you can see how helpful the grid lines are when sketching out your pattern. This pattern is somewhat complex, but you could most certainly simplify things! You could also draw your design on a piece of paper using a pencil and then transfer the design to your block. One of the awesome things about this material is that it accepts transfers easily. You simply need to lay your drawing (graphite side down) onto your block and rub firmly. Apparently, this also works with images from an inkjet printer. So cool.

Step 4: Carving time! The first step is to carve along all of your lines using your smallest carving tool. This will create a little “moat” so that when you come back in with your larger carving tool you will be much less likely to travel outside the lines. If you are new to carving this material, I highly recommend practicing on a scrap piece before you commit to a larger project. It can take some time to get the hang of it…for me, holding the carving tool in a more horizontal plane to the carving block prevents me from going too deep or gouging the material which gives me cleaner lines. I have also noticed that it is really important to carve away from all of the corners. This may require carving a line in two sections, but that’s okay. If you carve towards your corners, it’s very easy to move past the line and end up with a wanky corner. It doesn’t have to be perfect though, so if you mess up here or there, no worries!

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Step 5: Now you need to commit to where you do and don’t want to carve your block. You will need to think about the final design and how much positive and negative space you desire. Obviously any areas that you carve will be white (or the color of your fabric) and any uncarved areas will be the color of your ink. I used one of the larger v-shaped tools for this so that I could remove the material more quickly.

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Step 6: Next, you need to do a test print. I used a standard ink pad on white paper for this. Your test print will allow you to see areas that need to be cleaned up or carved more deeply. And you can also get an idea for how your overall design will look.

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Step 7: Once you’re satisfied with your design you will need to prepare your fabric for printing. First iron your fabric to remove any wrinkles. Next fold it in half in both directions and press a seam after each fold. This will give you the center of your fabric as well as vertical and horizontal lines to act as guides while you’re printing.

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Step 8: Place something under your fabric so that it doesn’t bleed through! I always use a piece of clear vinyl, but aluminum foil would work in a pinch.

Step 9: Find your center and start stamping. I’m using an ink pad that is specifically for use with fabric.

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Hmmmm, well I was hoping that it would print darker and I’m noticing that my math must have been a bit off  because my stamp isn’t reaching the edge. There are two potential problems with the color…either my ink pad is running low or the texture of my fabric is interfering with the ink transfer (this cotton pillow case has a grainier feel than some that I’ve used in the past). Despite my concerns, I pressed on.

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And then I screwed up. First on the lower right corner and then again in the next block up. What the bleep!!! I can understand once, but twice?! Sooooooo annoying! I would love to say that I get Martha Stewart perfect results every time, but I don’t. That’s not real life and it’s certainly not my real life.

I like the design so I’m going to try again on another pillow case. This time I will be using a 16 x 16 inch pillow case (because that’s all I have at the moment) so it will be interesting to see how my design lays out. I’m also going to try using some screen printing ink that I happened to have on hand. According to the product information, it can be used for block printing.

In traditional block printing, ink is placed on a piece of glass or plexi and a brayer is used to spread the ink into a thin, even coat and then it’s rolled onto a block. Unfortunately, as I attempted to roll out my ink I noticed that my brayer (which I haven’t picked up in a very long time) was not rolling properly. Time for plan B, I recalled reading somewhere that make-up sponges work well for applying ink to blocks and since I had a bag of those in the back of one of my cupboards, I went for that option.

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Step 9.1?: After ironing and placing a piece of vinyl in my pillow case, I inked up my stamp and got to work. This ink is definitely printing darker, but it’s also a bit “blobbier.” Make certain to press firmly and evenly onto all of your stamp – paying careful attention to your corners. You can lift a corner and peek at your print before removing it to be sure you didn’t miss anything.

Since my pattern went off the edge I found it useful to put a piece of paper or paper towel under the edge in order to keep things tidy (pic 2 above).

Step 10: Once I was done I noticed a few areas that didn’t print as dark as I wanted, so I re-inked that portion of my stamp and I carefully stamped on top. This worked surprisingly well! When you’re satisfied with your print, let it dry overnight and iron for 15-30 seconds to make your ink permanent and your fabric washable.

Here it is! What do you think?

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Eraser Stamp Pillow

 

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Alright people! This is a really cool project that truly doesn’t require ANY artistic ability! It’s a bit of a departure in that I won’t be doing any hand dyeing, but I figure that stamping on fabric is close enough. I have been enamored with printmaking since I took a class as an undergrad, so there may be more printmaking heading your way!

Materials:

Tutorial

Step 1: Get your hands on a large one of these:

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Step 2: Cut off one of the slanted ends with an exacto knife so that you have a rectangle.

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Step 3: Find the middle of your eraser (my eraser is one inch wide, so I marked it at 1/2 inch in a few places) and drew a line.

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Step 4: Okay, so I jumped the gun a bit in the pic above! Now start making angled lines along the length of your center line.

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Step 5: Use your lovely little block cutter to carve your lines. As you can see I din’t follow my lines exactly. This isn’t meant to be perfect – it is handmade after all! Besides (speaking as a partially reformed perfectionist) perfection is highly overrated.

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By the way, I have done block printing before using a variety of carving blocks. This is the first time that I have used an eraser and I have to say that I loved it! It carved really smoothly and easily.

Step 6: Ink up your stamp and do a test print. I’m using regular old stamp ink for this so that I don’t waste any of my pricey fabric ink. It is super important to do a test print because it allows you to see if you need to go back and carve a bit more here or there. Mine looks good!

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Step 7: Okay, so this is where my head started to hurt a bit. I decided to do this really cool pattern and although it isn’t hard, it definitely took me some time to wrap my brain around it. So I practiced on a few sheets of paper first. Here are my efforts.

By gosh, I think I finally got it! Wait, that doesn’t sound right?! I think it’s “by George,” right? Anyways, I got it!

Step 8: Iron your pillow case or whatever fabric you’re using. Fold it in half and then in half again and press it with your iron. This will give you the middle point as well as vertical and horizontal lines to help guide you as you stamp. Now place something under your fabric so that your stamp ink doesn’t bleed through. I’m using a piece of clear vinyl that I inserted between the two layers of my pillow case. The pic on the right shows the vinyl, it is folded in half to make it more visible to you, my dear readers. 🙂

Step 9: Find the center of your piece and begin stamping around that point. Ink your stamp well and be sure to press firmly and evenly when you place your stamp.

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This took some patience and a steady hand…I was doing great until the bottom left corner where I lost my focus and I placed a stamp in the wrong spot. So, I took a deep breath and I just kept going trying to form the same basic shape. It got a little out of control and I have to say that the perfectionist in me was freaking out a little bit. What was I saying about perfectionism being overrated?????

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In the end I think it looks cool. Who says that it has to be the same pattern the whole way through?! I think that the lesson here is that you can make a mistake (or 10) and it will still be okay. 🙂 🙂 🙂

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Step 10: Let your ink dry completely and then heat set it with your iron for 15-30 seconds (no steam). This will make your print permanent and it will allow you to wash your fabric if needed.

Well, there it is in all of it’s glory, what do you think?

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